When They See Us, The Dark Fantastic and The Origin of Others: Why and How White People Need to Watch, Read, and Self-critically Reflect

Soon after When They See Us began streaming on Netflix, I saw an article by Doug Criss on CNN’s website. The lead grabbed me right away: “I tried to watch ‘When They See Us,’” Criss declared. “I couldn’t even get past the trailer.” Criss attributed his feeling overcome to a cluster of related causes: “the …

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An “Office Hour” Appointment to Keep

“Office Hour” is a devastating play. But it’s a play whose questions about race, gender, and social class we should be willing to examine. This one-act drama—at Circle Theatre in Fort Worth through May 11—may resonate especially strongly with those of us who have already been “schooled” to think about intersectional identities in classrooms. And …

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Supporting “Contingent” Colleagues in Higher Education: What Tenure-Stream Faculty Can Do

It’s springtime in academe. Walking across campus is less a shivering ordeal and more an opportunity to savor the warmer air, the seasonal blooms—and the lively, post-spring-break energy our students are bringing to the classroom. But this is also a season of anxiety for “contingent” faculty. For part-time adjuncts and short-term, contracted-for-a-year teachers, the stress …

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A Thanksgiving of/for Learning: National Native American Heritage Month

I’ve purposefully waited until after the US Thanksgiving weekend to draft this blogpost. I’ve been thinking, throughout the entire month of November, about what to say. After all, November is National Native American Heritage Month. As noted on a webpage describing the rightful goal of honoring Native peoples throughout November, the “Library of Congress, National …

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“We Are All Bound Up Together”: Embrace the Powerful Heritage of Frances E. W. Harper’s Women’s Suffrage Rhetoric

Here's a recent TWEET from Civil Rights icon John Lewis: John Lewis (@repjohnlewis) 10/26/18, 1:09 PM The right to vote is precious, almost sacred. It is the most powerful nonviolent tool or instrument we have in a democratic society. Let nothing stand in your way to use it so that together we may build a …

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Teaching about Gender Identities in the Context of the Kavanaugh Controversy

I am an educator whose work includes teaching about gender identities in action. I am struggling with how to help my students right now, and in the days ahead, as they respond to the ongoing controversy around Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and multiple women’s charges against him. The impact of this intense conflict—played out …

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