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Revisiting Women’s Suffrage from an Intersectional Perspective

Hanging side by side above the imposing entrance to the southwest hall of the Library of Congress (LOC), three large banners announce exhibits currently open there. One is a permanent fixture at the LOC. A recreation of Thomas Jefferson’s impressive home library allows visitors to enter a circle of shelves showcasing the beautiful leather-bound volumes …

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Extending Veterans Day and Spotlighting Native Americans Who Have Served

“This star I am wearing is for my husband, a member of the great Sioux Nation, who is a volunteer in Uncle Sam’s Army.” From Gertrude Bonnin (Zitkala-Ša), writing in The American Indian Magazine, in an article on WWI Choctaw Code Talkers from WWI Veterans Day—a day to honor all the women and men who …

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Family Ties: College Students’ Writing Connecting the Classroom to Home

One story offers a compare-contrast parallel between a student’s move from an out-of-state home to the TCU campus and her grandmother’s mixed-emotions relocation from a beloved house to assisted living.  Another student author draws on an extended conversation with his father, describing episodes of the family’s extended period of homelessness during that dad’s growing-up years; …

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When They See Us, The Dark Fantastic and The Origin of Others: Why and How White People Need to Watch, Read, and Self-critically Reflect

Soon after When They See Us began streaming on Netflix, I saw an article by Doug Criss on CNN’s website. The lead grabbed me right away: “I tried to watch ‘When They See Us,’” Criss declared. “I couldn’t even get past the trailer.” Criss attributed his feeling overcome to a cluster of related causes: “the …

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An “Office Hour” Appointment to Keep

“Office Hour” is a devastating play. But it’s a play whose questions about race, gender, and social class we should be willing to examine. This one-act drama—at Circle Theatre in Fort Worth through May 11—may resonate especially strongly with those of us who have already been “schooled” to think about intersectional identities in classrooms. And …

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